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My Grandfather Would Have Shot Me

A Black Woman Discovers Her Family's Nazi Past

by Jennifer Teege

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Now in paperback: The internationally bestselling memoir hailed as "unforgettable" (Publishers Weekly) and "a stunning memoir of cultural trauma and personal identity" (Booklist).
At age 38, Jennifer Teege happened to pluck a library book from the shelf—and discovered a horrifying fact: Her grandfather was Amon Goeth, the vicious Nazi commandant depicted in Schindler's List. Reviled as the "butcher of Płaszów," Goeth was executed in 1946. The more Teege learned about him, the more certain she became: If her grandfather had met her—a black woman—he would have killed her.

Teege's discovery sends her into a severe depression—and fills her with questions: Why did her birth mother withhold this chilling secret? How could her grandmother have loved a mass murderer? Can evil be inherited?

Teege's story is cowritten by Nikola Sellmair, who also adds historical context and insight from Teege's family and friends, in an interwoven narrative. Ultimately, Teege's search for the truth leads her, step by step, to the possibility of her own liberation.


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Publisher: The Experiment

Kindle Book

  • Release date: April 7, 2015

OverDrive Read

  • ISBN: 9781615192540
  • Release date: April 7, 2015

EPUB eBook

  • ISBN: 9781615192540
  • File size: 3475 KB
  • Release date: April 7, 2015

PDF eBook

  • ISBN: 9781615192540
  • File size: 28966 KB
  • Release date: April 7, 2015


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0 of 1 copy available

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Kindle Book
OverDrive Read
EPUB eBook
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Languages

English

Now in paperback: The internationally bestselling memoir hailed as "unforgettable" (Publishers Weekly) and "a stunning memoir of cultural trauma and personal identity" (Booklist).
At age 38, Jennifer Teege happened to pluck a library book from the shelf—and discovered a horrifying fact: Her grandfather was Amon Goeth, the vicious Nazi commandant depicted in Schindler's List. Reviled as the "butcher of Płaszów," Goeth was executed in 1946. The more Teege learned about him, the more certain she became: If her grandfather had met her—a black woman—he would have killed her.

Teege's discovery sends her into a severe depression—and fills her with questions: Why did her birth mother withhold this chilling secret? How could her grandmother have loved a mass murderer? Can evil be inherited?

Teege's story is cowritten by Nikola Sellmair, who also adds historical context and insight from Teege's family and friends, in an interwoven narrative. Ultimately, Teege's search for the truth leads her, step by step, to the possibility of her own liberation.


Expand title description text